My research is focused on interaction design in the context of sustainable urbanization. I am also interested in food tech, animal-computer interaction, the quantified self, and digital literature. Here are few recent projects:


BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS:
THE STORIES OF MUNDANE TECHNOLOGIES

In this diary study, I investigated the uses of everyday technology in the context of personal relationships. How do people utilize technology in different spaces, and what implications might we see for the Internet of Things in light of this use? More importantly, how do people maintain a sense of community and personal connection through technology that is integrated into everyday practices?

A CALENDAR OF TALES:
PARTICIPATORY CULTURE AND INTERACTIVE BOOK DESIGN

This work investigates Neil Gaiman's book, A Calendar of Tales, which was published in a digital format in the fall of 2013. Gaiman solicited story ideas from his fans via Twitter and utilized crowd-sourced artwork throughout the book. My research highlights the unique design qualities that emerged from this project as well as the potential problems with such an approach to writing and publishing.

embedding PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES IN URBAN INFORMATICS

Cities are a unique domain for interaction design, and identifying and interpreting the spatial and experiential characteristics that exist in urban space will help us tackle evolving design challenges as they emerge in this technologically-infused landscape. Philosophy proves useful as a way to identify these characteristics and investigate them within the context of evolving technology use. 

WHAT GROWS IN SILICON VALLEY? the IDEOLOGY OF FOOD TECHNOLOgy

As the startup culture of Silicon Valley has shifted its sights beyond more traditionally “digital” realms of computing and the internet towards areas like food and food production, so too have the ideologies that found and constitute them begun to render these areas in their own terms. We explore this ideology and its implications by considering two specific cases of this phenomenon—Soylent and Niwa.

FICTIONAL CHARACTERS AND THE ROLE OF INTIMACY IN STORYTELLING

Is it possible for a person to develop intimate relationships with fictional characters, such as ones featured in books or film? With a focus on Game of Thrones, we aimed to understand how participants connected to characters,. Through the use of cultural probes, we could see that different levels of 'intimacy' developed through complex interpretations of medium-specific interactions.

UNDERSTANDING emotional experience: The Meanings of Comfort 

This research project aimed to understand how people define "comfort." The idea of comfort is essential in many user experiences, but how do people think about comfort in their everyday lives? More importantly, how might these conceptions help us to better understand future technologies? Through interviews and observation, I learned about the different kinds of comfort that people experience. 

Embodied speculation and design futuring at the public library

We developed a pervasive urban game to think through the future of knowledge-sharing, particularly in the context of public libraries, whose traditional purposes have undergone upheaval with the rise of digital technologies. The players, observers from another reality, interact with a robot from their world, who guides them as they document and curate knowledge sharing practices and public spaces.

Women In clothes: resourcefulness of Everyday Design

In this contextual inquiry, we investigate how artists re-purpose materials in the context of creative projects. We are also interested in the way that these materials shape and inform the artists' work, as well as the impact they have on the major themes of their work. We focus particularly on the work of one artist who explores femininity and the female form in fashion design. 

REMEMBER WHAT IT WAS TO BE ME: EVERYDAY LIFE AND THE QUANTIFIED SELF

Never before, have we been able to capture so much data about ourselves, but what does it mean to take our everyday experiences and represent them with a quantitative set of data? I explored the Reporter App, and considered not only the implications of utilizing quantitative data as a means of introspection, but also the importance of storytelling in shaping the identities we create for ourselves.